Simple Email Marketing
Home > Resource Center > Help articles > Using symbols or emojis in your subject line

Using symbols or emojis in your subject line

Table of contents
No headers

You might decide to try using a symbol or emoji in your mailing's subject line to call attention to your message. We've seen some cases of increased open rates for mailings using these, though it differs based on industry.

We tested using an emoji from Facebook Symbols across email clients. We copied the emoji and pasted it into the subject line field:

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 9.58.31 AM.png

We found that the emoji didn't appear properly in Outlook 2003, 2007, 2010 and 2013's notification popups. Here's an example from Outlook 2010:

-2.png

It also didn't appear properly in:

  • Outlook 2000, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2010 and 2013 on the desktop
  • BlackBerry 4 OS
  • Yahoo! Mail (Explorer, Chrome, Firefox)
  • Outlook.com
  • Lotus Notes 6.5, 7, 8 and 8.5
  • Thunderbird 3.0
  • Android 2.3 and 4.0
  • Gmail App (Android)
  • AOL Mail (Explorer, Chrome, Firefox)
  • Gmail (Explorer, Chrome, Firefox)
  • Outlook.com (Explorer, Chrome)

When it appeared as an error, it looked like a small box, a different pizza emoji (in color or black and white), two question marks or other decidedly non-original pizza emoji.

Here's how it looked in Android 4.0:

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 10.04.47 AM.png

Gmail (Firefox):

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 10.07.02 AM.png

Outlook.com (Explorer):

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 10.07.23 AM.png

However, the emoji's appearance seems to depend on that character. Here, we tried two other emoji, also from Facebook Symbols. Here's how it looked in Mac Mail 7.2:

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 10.23.34 AM.png

Gmail (Firefox):

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 10.26.49 AM.png

iPhone 4:

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 10.28.21 AM.png

The bottom line: While not necessary to use, emojis can make your email stand out in an overwhelmed inbox, and we all know that challenge. We suggest split testing two or three subject lines to judge for yourself how your own contacts choose to interact with your mailings. And, as always, test, test, test before sending out to your audience.

 

You must to post a comment.
Last modified
09:31, 25 Apr 2017

Tags

Classifications

This page has no classifications.